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about any of these events visit us at s f gvment gov tv dot ordinary care an please beware that the commission [inaudible] any mobile devices that may sound off during the proceedings. if you'd like to speak on an agendized item, please fill out a speaker card and when speaking to the commission speak into the microphone and do state your name for the record. i'd like to take roll at this time. commission president fong? >> here. >> commission vice president wu? >> here. >> commissioner antonini? >> present. >> commissioner borden? >> here. >> commissioner moore? >> here. >> commissioner sugaya? >> here. >> first up, commissioners, on your calendar, consideration of items proposed for continuance, item 1, case no. 2012.1442c for 795 folsom street, request for conditional use authorization is being proposed for continuance to february 28th, 2013. i have no other items proposed for continuance and i have no speaker cards. >> is there any public comment on the one item proposed for continuance? seeing none, public comment is closed. commissioners? commissioner sugaya. >> move
] correct it for lots along the way. i understand people say it could be specialty use. we have these situations all the time. we approved philanthropic uses which applies to certain lots because the project sponsor we had earlier in sacramento street was also specific more to a lot we were able to expand it. something that might be easier to consider to look at this more broadly if the legal asian of existing off-site kitchens, having a process or pass maybe city-wide for that. i imagine there are a lot of illegal off-site kitchens. the issue around food trucks, i have a restaurant right on the corner from where i live that also has a food truck. i see the food going back and forth. i know other [speaker not understood] don't have brick and mortar restaurants. they're [speaker not understood], one first step just might be legalization of an existing off-site restaurant and ncts throughout the city could be step one. and then step two, looking at -- because obviously most people are fine with the status quo. the issue is we don't know if we do a new balance, creating kitchens al
. for us that's not a big deal. there are a lot of murals in sacramento and san francisco that is all permission based. for us, we're kind of a sdae zero tolerance city in sacramento. you go out and you vandalize something, that's a crime. that's how we view that in our city. >> i tell them it's art, you got to express yourself but you cannot damage other people's property. i usually say how many of you have a little brother or sister, you don't want to teach them to steal. how do you feel when they mess up your stuff? that's how i approach it. >> also we try to leave that at the end where tibo, played by anthony over here, that's basically how the character evolves throughout the play, being this leader of this crew and, you know, he kind of teaches everybody but says, yeah, you have a leader but i ain't going to do what you are going to do. robert over here who plays damage, he's the antagonist. he's kind of damaged but at the end, you know, these guys, oh, hey, you know what, you gt a talent, let's turn that into some artistic talent, he's going to go to college to try to imp
grew up in the city and used the parks and now the grandmother of 13 grandchildren, but not one of them lives in san francisco and this is a big part due to the economic conditions of our city, which drive our families out of town. so i am here to talk about how we have to prioritize our city parks. i echo what dennis has just reported on, but the quality of life issues in san francisco and our parks and their healthy maintenance and vitality is what is a true quality of life issue for san franciscans. we need a bigger part of the general fund budget. we need to make sure that even though we have scholarships and ways for poor children, that is not good enough. we need to roll back the fees and we need the kind of environment that children grew up in san francisco, that free access to public parks and that amazing system that we all came to know. there is no reason that we can't do that again, but it takes commitment and other funding options and may require reprioritizing our city's needs and parks are things that do help with public safety, mental illness and all kinds of other woes
stay home and let you get shot over something stupid. >> go home and lead. the rest of us got work to do. >> you don't have to do this. you don't have to buy this kind of trouble. you can good a little further and do the right thing. >> what's that? >> i don't know, but it ain't this. this is negative. kids die young over this kind of stuff. >> we're in a war. >> no you're not. >> it's a stupid war, then. go home, all of y'all. go home now!. >> hey, come back here right now. come back here right now. that's it, heat, you ain't my folk. >> i am your folk. >> you ain't my folk. >> i am your best friend. i can take that but i'm not going to your funeral, man. i ain't going to no more funerals. >> come back. >> let's look at what happens to (inaudible) and tibo >> yo >> what's up, man? >> not much, man. what you been up to since last we talked? >> i just been thinking a lot about what you said. >> i didn't mean to come off so hard. >> that's just it, you were right. do the right thing. i'm heading to college, art class. >> go ahead, i'm proud of you, man. >> bad boys, bad boys
based, we might not see a whole lot of schools but he has a whole other job. we used to go out and do two performances a week so we were doing 16 or 18 but it's just -- with the manpower shortage, since 2007 our theater department has lost like 40 percent of what we usually do. i know that noel's department, he's lost people and programs and hopefully things are going to get better. >> it says a lot for the program when in rough budget times, we're still around. so we meet a lot of students. >> success stories of kids who were going the wrong way? >> as a matter of fact, the first couple semesters, where we did a break out session, where we break out with the teachers and their students and one of the actual kids said, you know, something is going on in my house, my brother's a gang banger, the house is abusive, and that breakout session, that child actually reached out to us. we were able to get dps to actually pull her out of her house so it's a good venue for those kids to express that. >> i had a fourth grader who told me, he said if they think i can do better in the world. he w
is war. everybody attack, all the gangs beating on us, now it's time we take back the hood. we're going to tag it up big and reclaim the store. my cousin coming strapped for back-up so if anything happens. >> hey, what's up, man? >> what y'all planning. >> we hit them back and we hit them hard. >> listen to me, all of you. go home. go home before you get yourselves killed. >> what are you talking about? >> can't you see what's going on in your own hood? you think we're going to let that happen? no, i'm not. >> come on, tibo, you're a leader. >> yeah, but i also want to (inaudible). >> i want to lead as many of these kids out of here as i can. >> we ain't playing no more, this is real. three of our kids are dead now. >> a coward would stay home and let you get shot over something stupid. >> go home and lead. the rest of us got work to do. >> you don't have to do this. you don't have to buy this kind of trouble. you can good a little further and do the right thing. >> what's that? >> i don't know, but it ain't this. this is negative. kids die young over this kind of stuff
to our lives. then, what a chef wants, this man will find. tag along with us as we go on a produce pursuit in northern california. then, meet a farmer who is surrounded by his favorite things--his berries and his brothers. finally, think starting a vegetable garden is hard? our expert has advice to get you started and on your way to a homegrown meal in no time. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> so we all know that california is king when it comes to growing citrus. and when it comes to growing lemons, no one is bigger than this ventura county farm. and with over 7,000 acres of lush lemon trees, limoneira isn't just the biggest lemon grower in california, but in all of north america. based in santa paula, the farm is a testament to what hard work and determination can do. founding fathers nathan blanchard and wallace hardison first bought the land way back in 1893 and named the ranch limoneira, which means "lemon lands" in portuguese. >> and at the time, they wanted to bring about the first full-scale commercial ope
have the next generation of science coming up on us and just recently approved are the new eld strapped aders and that is going to be a fundamental change and not just how we refer to the professioncy levels but that is a body of work that is embedded through ut the day throughout all of the con content areas and there is a great deal of work that needs to be part of the our road map moving forward. >> so could we find another place or way to have more detail on this? or maybe the opportunity to actually have a discussion about this? >> i would think that say curriculum committee item. >> so to say that we have already slated moving toward the common core implementation with the focus on the humanities at the may 6th committee. i don't expect a lot of answers but a road map in the direction that the district is pursuing will be discussed. >> i think that commissioners you will be getting more information and we are planning to be at the next board of education meeting to give you an update on the allow plan and so as you begin to see all of these different pieces and these different pla
, and the very strategies that allow us to take into consideration. but the most important part of it is the beginning, acknowledging the trauma that could have happened in that person's life. and dr. gillece, how do we screen for that? well, i think when you do trauma-informed care, i think what's really important too is to create environments of care that do no more harm. there are many different screenings that we can use for trauma. but i think, then, it's really important for those systems to be prepared to do something about it once we screen. can you tell us a little bit about which ones we're using? well, there's many different. there's many, many different trauma screens. we used to use everything from brief trauma screens to the ace study to short screens that are used to try to not retraumatize-for example, in jail-that just may ask four or five questions. so, there's many, many trauma screens that are very good and excellent for use. and what type of questions are they, for example? well, some questions are like, for the brief ones that we have used in prisons and ja
solar for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to speak with you about it. the origin is that as the united states attorney, the administration wants me, wants all the united states attorneys, to go out into the community. it's actually a very different role for the united sta
a short drive away from sacramento. andhat brings us to our first story. if you're anything like me, you've probably consumed this next produce item at let once this week. that's because it's been called america's favorite vegeble. but we like to call it a reason to get our hands dirty and meet some real potato pioneers. with their adaptability and versatility, it's wonder potatoes are a fan favorite. bad, mashed, diced, or scalloped, no matter how you slice it, from potato chips to french fries d almost anything in between, the potato has been a staple of our diet throughout history and today. and there's no denying we have a special love affair with t spuds. you know, on average, each of us will actually eat 135 pounds of potatoes a year, and in a wide variety of forms. in fact, potatoes are the leading vegetable crop in the united states, with annual total production being about 41 billion pounds. and they've been a staple ron lehr's family farm since the 1930s.his third genetion farmer grows more th 2,500 acres of the vegetable just outside of bakersfield, and knows just what to loo
's office. i personally want to thank zoom wynn who has been in that transition for us. she's a real delight to have work with in this time period. she's held the office together and i want to thank her permly for being here today. (applause) >> a great job. you know, it comes as no surprise probably for all of us that i've chosen carmen. carmen has been willing to step up to be the assessor. if you look at what she's done and has been at the helm of our budget committee and working with my office and all the financial entities, of course, truly representing the board at the budget office last couple years. we've done a tremendous amount of good work together and she's made that connection that i have often spoke about in working with the board together on the budgets and making sure we cover all the interests and needs. but also being very fiscally smart and brilliant in her efforts to help me do the first of two-year budgeting for the city, which is incredibly important. and i'll say later on why it means so much to rating agencies and others that we do even better fiscally. but at the sam
-up. >> true. i'll run with you guys. >> look, you can't decide you are kicking with us, we don't bang, we don't want nothing from your gang. >> you mean to tell me if a gang crossed you out, you do nothing. >> i do this for the fun, the thrill. you start banging, i'm quiting. >> the gang, x1, city-wide damage. i don't want any of that. >> we'll see, man, we'll see. (music). >> (inaudible) dangerous element but it's all about fun, right? until. >> hey, mr. torrez, are you all right? >> they ran in, they grabbed all the money out of the register, they even grabbed a case of beer. >> i'll call the police. >> what is that going to do? that's it. you know they are coming back and next time i'm going to be ready. >> i'm worried about him. he can't sleep. he keeps hoping -- hopping out of bed every time he hears a sound. >> i know what you're going through. my boy would have graduated high school this year. >> i remember him. he was such a polite boy. just in the wrong place at the wrong time. another innocent victim of random violence. >> why do so many children have guns anyway. isn't t
we have there. and there is no sporectiontionv to put in the products. the kitchen we use across the street is mainly for making soup stockses and cleaning lettuce and vegetables and stuff like that so we don't have any cross contamination of pro scenes. it's very important. * proteins i do want to say something about cafe floor. our taxes are current. i don't understand why this was brought up when everything is just fine with us tax wise. and thank you very much. >> thank you. ken bunch, deborah aiano, gerald -- i'm sorry, can't read that last name. john kodera. sister honey bee, ron schmidt. >>> hello, my name is kenneth bunch. i'm the founder of the sisters of perpetual indulgence. cafe floor is like any other business in the castro, any other business or cafe. it's a community center. over the last couple of decades, people meet there to talk about issues and to make plans and form organizations, [speaker not understood] the sister. we've all at various times met there to plan our activities. as well, cafe floor has donated thousands of dollars to charity, to our charities
to the choices that are made in this play so that later, when we come talk to you, you can tell us how you would handle these situations. so it's time for you to use your mind and listen so you can learn how to make the wise choice, the right choice, to be leaders instead of followers. did i forget to mention? the name of this play is the fall of (inaudible). drop dead. >> what's up, what's up. >> welcome to the prologue. how are you doing out there? >> great. >> i said, how are you doing out there? all right, all right, now be quiet. we are here today to save your lives. maybe, it can happen, just listen. we're just like you, we're students. we got some students from john f. kennedy high school, and here we got some students from martin luther king junior high school out there. and we'd like to give a special shout out to assistant principal braxton. we'd like to present something for you to think about and then come to your groups and talk about it and hopefully we end something and hopefully we don't end our lives in tragedy. this isn't tragedy like the ancient greeks used to do like so
lives in tragedy. this isn't tragedy like the ancient greeks used to do like sophocles and euripides. we have our principal characters and a greek chorus (music). >> i'm an ares, i'll be playing the role of the prince. that's it for costumes, guys, we're on a tight budget. what makes a tragedy a tragedy? the ancient greeks would say it's from a king falls from grace. he was once a great king but a few scenes later he was blind and starving. it's the choices you make that determine your outcomes. now, before we begin i want you to guys to remember this story is based on true events. this is fictionalized. >> we didn't paint that on that wall. >> look at my store. every time someone paints on my wall, you show up. >> i'm sorry, but according to the city's ordinance. >> according to the ordinance, it costs over $200. you know who is doing it, what are you going to do to stop them. >> are you the police? >> code enforcement. >> code enforcement, the garbage man, i don't care. i called over an hour ago. just because my door faces the boulevard these kids treat it like it's their
that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no, but, but, so we are not funding or digging into can urriculum in that way. but you certainly have seen superintendent caranza happened about what happens with the kinds of conversations that happen with the movie bully and there are can urriculum packages being developed. i had visions, gary, to think about how if folks decided -- and we don't play in this -- but if folks decided there could be a class on this, how you teach, life skills class, right? if we try to make a one-size fits all click approach that doesn't really take people from where they are and get them to where they need to go. i have seen life skills work well and i have seen students literally filling out mcdonald's applications in their life skills class. so you can't just quickly eradicate and we can't just think about this in an isolated silo the link, for example, that has been alluded
, so i knew that that wasn't good. >> and that was our nightmare. >> a parent came to us, we'd known her personally, the whole family, for a long time. and she told me, she asked -- i thank her for the courage it took to come forward. she said, i don't know how to tell you this, but i think there's so much going on. >> she told us her son had come to her and told her there was a picture jill had sent to him in december naked in her body and it had been passed to another boy and then to another boy and put up on the internet. >> he told me he had these pictures of jill and he was telling everybody that they were on his email account. so everybody went on the email account and they saw and they sent them to themselves just to have them just to, i don't know, just to --. >> we were very surprised when she told us about the picture. we had no idea. jill was very private, we couldn't understand why she would send something like that to a boy that she wasn't a boyfriend, it was just a friend. >> our first thought, this isn't true. we first thought this can't be true. then i thought
us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. families will testify it continues. it hits the community and now we have to continue to pull ourselves up and help our other daughter and the challenges of raising and parenting another child. you know, we can't just pull up in a shell. she has the right to have a childhood. she deserves to go to go to college. she deserves to be happy. we need to teach her
, portland, maine and elsewhere. if you have ideas you should never hesitate to call us. we're not a grant making arm in our division but we have the auspices of the department of justice so if it's not mean i'll make sure to funnel you to the right place so you can have that conversation. >> tom, what else, are there other best practices, other communities that stand out as you have traveled that resonate with you. >> like so many things, governor, it starts with leadership. the programs i look to and i say, i'd like my kid to go to this school, it starts out with clear leadership at the top. it then starts out with clear policy direction so that the rules are set out in a very clear and transparent way. it continues with partnerships so that there is, you know, there are community-based partners, a recognition that this isn't just a teacher responsibility, it's really a community responsibility. and it's like so many things, it's about culture development. you know, what is your institutional culture? i work with a lot of police departments in a different world where we're dealing w
will be there and the public is welcome and we will be starting at 10 a.m. in sacramento and so please join us. >> thank you. >> one last before we move on, commissioner mendoza reminds me one last item. tomorrow is the media day for the youth arts festival which will be opening i believe next week the 7th of march. and at the asian art museum this year, this is a new venue for it, it is the youth art festival and a lot of performance and visual art displays. >> it is young at heart. >> no it is youth festival now. >> yeah. >> so, i will be participating the superintendent will be participating. and i believe that the mayor as well will be there. he is hosting the media event tomorrow on the steps, yes. and so you may will get some coverage and maybe you will check out the arts festival and it is going to be great. >> we are going to move on now to item t and report of closed section actions. from the closed section of february 19, 2013, the board of education approved by a vote of five ayes and two absent, mendoza and maufas the expulsion of one student. and five ayes and one nay the executive director. >
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)